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October 2020 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Nutrition and Immunity
» Maintaining Musculoskeletal Health
» Back and neck Pain from Working at Home
» Staying Fit and Healthy
» Staying Healthy
» Dr. Oz Revealed These Handy Tips For Giving Your Immune System A Much-Needed Boost
» What Should You Know About Spinal Decompression Therapy
» Get 'Active and Adaptive' During National Chiropractic Health Month
» Cardiovascular Health May Begin with Breakfast
» Women: Want to Avoid Heart Failure? Try Walking

Nutrition and Immunity

Nutrition and Immunity

 

harvard logo

 

"During the flu season or times of illness, people often seek special foods or vitamin supplements that are believed to boost immunity. Vitamin C and foods like citrus fruits, chicken soup, and tea with honey are popular examples. Yet the design of our immune system is complex and influenced by an ideal balance of many factors, not just diet, and especially not by any one specific food or nutrient. However, a balanced diet consisting of a range of vitamins and minerals, combined with healthy lifestyle factors like adequate sleep and exercise and low stress, most effectively primes the body to fight infection and disease."

 

For more information, please visit: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/nutrition-and-immunity/

Author: The President and Fellows of Harvard College
Source: 2020 The President and Fellows of Harvard College


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Maintaining Musculoskeletal Health

Maintaining Musculoskeletal Health 

verywell health logo vector

Many people with arthritis resist regular physical activity or exercise because they fear it will increase pain or further damage their joints. The body is supposed to move; our joints allow for movement.
In fact, movement eases joint stiffness, reduces joint pain, strengthens the muscles which surround the joints, and help us maintain a healthy weight. The benefits are real, so keep moving!

 

For more information, please visit: https://www.verywellhealth.com/ways-to-keep-your-joints-healthy-189256

 

Author: Carol Eustice
Source: verywell health


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Back and neck Pain from Working at Home

Back and neck Pain from Working at Home

okeefe ccenter

 

"The COVID-19 pandemic has more Americans working from home. The resulting uptick in makeshift home offices has also led to more reports of back and neck pain. 92% of chiropractors reported seeing more neck and back pain complaints since stay-at-home orders took effect in March.
If you're experiencing these symptoms while working from home, a chiropractor can help."

 

For more information, please visit: https://www.okeefechiropractic.net/index.php?p=544019&action=view&post_id=4275

Author: O'Keefe Chiropractic Center
Source: ProfessionalPlanets.com


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Staying Fit and Healthy

Staying Fit and Healthy

ASN Logo"There is a direct relationship between your diet, physical activity, and health. Your nutrition is a key player when it comes to physical, mental, and social well-being. And it’s important for preventing disease.
Lifestyle factors may also determine if you’re going to get sick or remain healthy. One of those factors is physical activity (PA). A sedentary lifestyle is usually associated with an increased risk for chronic disease, loss of movement, and decreased immune health. For those reasons, physical activity and movement are extremely important during the coronavirus pandemic. With that in mind, I will cover the benefits of PA, where your focus should be, how to think about exercising, equipment, how much you should be doing, and much more."

 

For more information, visit: https://nutrition.org/how-to-stay-fit-and-healthy-during-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic/

 

Author: Antonio Faneite
Source: American Society for Nutrition


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Staying Healthy

Staying Healthy

mayo clinic

"There are measures that we can take to stay healthy. Maintaining your overall health strengthens your immune system.
1. Eat a well balanced diet abundant in fruits, vegetables, and protein. Minimize sugar intake. Do not eat at night. If you have dietary questions, please ask. We can provide sample diets.
2. Exercise 3x per week. Taking a walk 3x per week can fulfill this goal.
3. Get 7 to 9 hours of sleep every night
4. Stay hydrated. Drink water everyday"

For more information, please visit: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256#:~:text=You've%20probably%20heard%20the,a%20day%20might%20be%20enough.

 

Consider a multi vitamin supplement to fill in any gaps where you may be lacking in your diet

https://www.accutrition.com/pure-encapsulations-mens-pure-pack-30-packets.html

https://www.accutrition.com/pure-encapsulations-womens-pure-pack-30-packets.html

https://www.accutrition.com/pure-encapsulations-one-multivitamin-60-capsules.html

https://www.accutrition.com/pure-encapsulations-puredefense-with-nac-120-capsules.html

 

If you have questions, please feel free to ask. We are here to help!

O'Keefe Chiropractic Center
609-654-4299
[email protected]

 

Author: Mayoclinic
Source: Mayoclinic


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Dr. Oz Revealed These Handy Tips For Giving Your Immune System A Much-Needed Boost

Dr. Oz Revealed These Handy Tips For Giving Your Immune System A Much-Needed Boost

Dr. Mehmet Oz spends his days doling out medical advice and health tips on his eponymous TV series. And now the famous health expert has shared a helpful set of tips to keep the immune system strong – and some of them are way easier than you might think.
It’s vital to your health that you keep your immune system in tip-top shape – regardless of the presence of a global viral threat. This group of cells, bodily chemicals and processes does its part to battle the toxins, bacteria and viruses that enter your system. In the face of coronavirus, then, it is worth keeping all of these defenses at the ready
Because of the novelty of the coronavirus, it’s unclear just how contagious – or deadly – it can be. But it has spread rapidly around the globe from its origin in Wuhan, China, and it has a mortality rate so far of between one and three percent. For that reason alone, it’s a good idea to fortify your immune system now – and Dr. Oz has shared his best methods for doing so.
What experts do know are the symptoms that come with this novel strain of coronavirus. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed the most common symptoms as fever, dry cough and tiredness. On top of that, some have experienced aches and pains, nasal congestion, a runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea.

https://scribol.com/lifestyle/health-and-body/dr-oz-coronavirus-tips-boost-immunity-survival-guide/14/

 

Author: Andrea Marchiano
Source: Scribol April 3, 2020


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What Should You Know About Spinal Decompression Therapy

What Should You Know About Spinal Decompression Therapy

webmdlogo

"If you have lasting back pain and other related symptoms, you know how disruptive to your life it can be. You may be unable to think of little else except finding relief. Some people turn to spinal decompression therapy -- either surgical or nonsurgical"

"Nonsurgical spinal decompression is a type of motorized traction that may help relieve back pain. Spinal decompression works by gently stretching the spine. That changes the force and position of the spine. This change takes pressure off the spinal disks -- gel-like cushions between the bones in your spine -- by creating negative pressure in the disc. As a result, bulging or herniated disks may retract, taking pressure off nerves and other structures in your spine. This helps promote movement of water, oxygen, and nutrient-rich fluids into the disks so they can heal."

Author: Ross Brakeville
Source: https://www.webmd.com/back-pain/qa/what-is-non-surgical-spinal-decompression-the


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Get 'Active and Adaptive' During National Chiropractic Health Month

During this October's National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM), the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and chiropractors nationwide are encouraging the public to get "active and adaptive" to maintain their musculoskeletal health and function in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Since March, many people have incorporated changes into their daily routines to reduce their potential exposure to the novel coronavirus: avoiding crowded public spaces, working from home, forgoing air travel for long car trips, ordering food and supplies online, and avoiding gyms and health clubs.  Because of this new normal, many are moving less and experiencing musculoskeletal pain.  Polls conducted by ACA confirm that chiropractors are seeing an increase in musculoskeletal conditions such as back pain, neck pain, and headaches since the beginning of the pandemic. When asked what they believe is contributing most to these conditions, ACA members cite lack of movement, stress and poor posture as key factors.  During NCHM, chiropractors are encouraging the public to choose healthy ways to adapt to the new normal by getting enough movement during the day, being aware of posture and ways to improve it, getting adequate rest, and managing stress naturally.  Learn more by visiting Hands Down Better and follow the conversation on social media with the hashtag #ActiveAdaptive.  "Inactivity has been a growing problem worldwide, even before the pandemic.  While the coronavirus may limit our options, finding ways to incorporate more physical activity, as well as improved posture, throughout the day can benefit our health now and into the future," said ACA President Robert C. Jones, DC.  National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) is a nationwide observance held each October.  NCHM educates the public about the importance of musculoskeletal health and raises awareness of the benefits of chiropractic care and its natural, patient-centered and drug-free approach to pain management, health and wellness.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: Acatoday.org, September 9, 2020.


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Cardiovascular Health May Begin with Breakfast

There are several ways to lower the risks of heart attack, cardiovascular disease, blood vessel diseases, and stroke. Although it is important to watch the kind of food that goes into the body, many studies have shown that it may be equally as important to pay attention to the timing of meals. Here are three ways to boost cardiovascular health:
1. Meal Planning. According to a statement released by the American Heart Association, planning the meals and snacks that you have throughout the day can help lower the risks of cardiovascular disease. This is due to the metabolic rates of the body throughout the day.
2. Eating Breakfast Daily. Several studies have found correlations between increased cardiovascular health and people who consume breakfast regularly. There is a much lower risk of high cholesterol and high blood pressure associated with those who consume breakfast daily.
3. Lowering Food Consumption in the Evening. At night it is harder for the body to digest and process various foods. Many studies have shown that this may be due to a decreased metabolic rate in the evening. For this reason, lowering the amount of food eaten in the evening can lead to better cardiovascular health.
Using these methods to carefully plan meals and snacks for each day can help reduce the many risk factors surrounding cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, and insulin complications such as insulin resistance.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online January 30, 2017.


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Women: Want to Avoid Heart Failure? Try Walking

New research suggests that women who exercise regularly, including walking, may lower their risk for heart failure. The study from researchers at the University of Buffalo in New York looked at over 137,000 women aged 50-79, of which over one-third had high blood pressure and other heart disease risk factors such as smoking and diabetes. After a follow-up period of 14 years, researchers found that the women who got some form of physical activity were less likely to suffer from heart failure (11%). Women with the highest levels of physical activity, meanwhile, were the least likely to suffer from heart failure (35%), as compared to women who got no exercise at all. In addition, women who got the most physical activity were the least likely to develop a sub-type of heart failure called reduced ejection fraction (32%) as compared to women who never exercised. 33% of the same group of women were also the least likely to develop another sub-type of heart failure called a preserved ejection fraction. One of the biggest findings from the study, however, is that walking works just as well as other forms of exercise, including more vigorous types. To discover how much exercise the women got, researchers studied answers to a questionnaire about exercise that every participant completed. As it turns out, walking was the most common type of physical activity reported.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JACC: Heart Failure, online September 5, 2018.


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